Twice-Told Tales

1963

Action / Horror / Mystery / Romance / Sci-Fi

Synopsis


Uploaded By: FREEMAN
March 30, 2021 at 09:46 PM

Director

Cast

Vincent Price as Alex Medbourne / Dr. Giacomo Rappaccini / Gerald Pyncheon
Beverly Garland as Alice Pyncheon
Richard Denning as Jonathan Maulle
Joyce Taylor as Beatrice Rappaccini
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
1.08 GB
1280*772
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
2 hr 0 min
P/S 2 / 5
2 GB
1776*1072
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
2 hr 0 min
P/S 0 / 8

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by The_Void 8 / 10

Excellent sixties omnibus

Twice-Told Tales is a trio of horror stories based on the writings of Nathaniel Hawthorne. Each story stars horror maestro Vincent Price, and this allows the man to show his range in a series of different roles throughout the film. All of Price's roles allow him to show his dark side, but it's the way that he is allowed to show this that makes each one stand out. Vincent Price is my favourite horror actor, and he's arguably the best ever. The fact that he stars in each segment of this film is reason enough alone to see it. The fact that every tale is good is another one. In true omnibus style, the first story is the least memorable; but it's still well worth seeing. We follow two friends who discover a virgin spring in the crypt of one of their loves. This story is good because it follows the ever-present dream of ever-lasting life. The way that the plot builds is somewhat predictable, but still good as we get to see the great horror master turn his performance around from do-gooder to something more sinister. Not the best opener to an omnibus film; but a long way from the worst.

The second story is by far the best and, in a way, it's a shame that this story was a part of the omnibus. The second tale is a fairytale horror story of love, protection and madness and follows the tale of an overbearing father that takes steps to ensure that his daughter doesn't sin like her mother did. This story is a variation on the classic 'Romero and Julliet' story, and takes in all the tragedy of that tale by its conclusion. Tale number two is highly original and would make this film worth viewing even if the other two tales were absolute rubbish (which, of course, they're not). The third and final segment is the weakest of the trio, but still manages an excellent Gothic style and a solid story. The reason it's the weakest is mainly because it's really slow; but once it gets started, this tale of greed, witchcraft and murder provides a satisfying end to this trio of stories. With a running time of two hours, Twice-Told Tales is a very long omnibus; and it could have done with being a bit shorter. However, this doesn't harm it too much, and if you're a fan of sixties horror, and/or Vincent Price, this will be a must see.

Reviewed by BrandtSponseller 10 / 10

Tell me again!

This is a compilation of three short films based on Nathaniel Hawthorne works--Heidegger's Experiment, Rappaccini's Daughter and The House of Seven Gables. All feature Vincent Price in a lead role. In Heidegger's Experiment, Dr. Carl Heidegger (Sebastian Cabot), obsessed with his deceased fiancée for 38 years, discovers a possible fountain of youth. But will restored youth bring happiness? In Rappaccini's Daughter, Professor Rappaccini (Price) discovers a "treatment" that will prevent his daughter from committing or being subjected to the same evils as his wife. And in The House of Seven Gables, a 150-year-old injustice leads to a unshakable curse.

First, a "warning" of sorts to potential viewers who are not acclimated to films of bygone eras. When compared to modern horror such as Saw (2004), Twice-Told Tales is relatively slow, talky, stagy, and uneventful. It may even be relatively slow, talky, stagy and uneventful compared to many films of its era. That doesn't mean it isn't a good film. But if you're not acclimated to the style, it takes some getting used to.

It's definitely worth getting used to, because these three short films by director Sidney Salkow are atmospheric, captivating stories, full of horror if you are able to slow yourself down and be absorbed by them. The film's fine technical elements--the sets, costumes, cinematography, lighting, music and so on--help draw one in to the proceedings.

As with most Hawthorne, the stories have strong moral subtexts, often hinging on just deserts for questionable ethical decisions, which are often themselves made with an aim of protecting ethical "purity" in some way. Or in other words, a few bad decisions combined with trying to do the "right thing" often leads to horrifying situations due to a kind of karmic retribution--basically kicking oneself in the bum. There are occasionally innocent parties--such as Rappaccini's daughter, but they tend to be few and far between. Speaking of Rappaccini's Daughter, it's interesting to note that this could easily count as an early sci-fi tale from Hawthorne.

For horror fans, the most important aspect of the film is that Twice-Told Tales' scenarios are macabre and frequently terrifying. Although you certainly shouldn't expect gore in a film like this, there are a few skeletons, crispy critters and a surprising amount of blood in one segment. But gore in itself doesn't necessarily produce the feeling of being horrified, which is more a sinking feeling in the pit of one's stomach at the realization that everything has suddenly gone to hell. Although I agree that gore wouldn't hurt (I'm a big Fangoria fan, too), what creates the horrific in Twice-Told Tales are the impeccably established characters and relationships followed by tragic changes in their relationships. Salkow and the cast slowly but flawlessly build tension in this way, and all of the segments have wonderfully nihilistic endings. Only the House of Seven Gables offers a slight glimpse of hope at the end.

Twice-Told Tales isn't the first compilation film or even the first horror compilation film, but it is one of the earlier, better and influential examples. Salkow's impact on horror wasn't to end here, as he went on to co-direct the excellent Price vehicle The Last Man on Earth in 1964, which was a big influence on subsequent films such as 28 Days Later (2002). He also directed a few episodes of "The Addams Family", before finishing out his career with a few westerns.

Reviewed by funkyfry 7 / 10

Unusual Vincent Price trilogy

Excellent little drive-in thriller thinly disguised as a literary adaption. Seeing all-time screen scream queen Beverly Garland share the screen with the master Vincent Price is a joy to fans of hammy acting everywhere! Richard Denning is also there with very strange hair and his usual straight mannerisms.

Some pretty weird, morbid tales, done with some intelligence while still giveing lots of opportunities for gore of the hanging skeleton variety. I especially liked the second story, with the killer plant, as I thought it was a refreshing idea and that the colors in the garden were quite nice. A worthy competitor to AIP's other excellent trilogies of terror.

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