The Ugly Duckling

1959

Comedy / Crime

2
IMDb Rating 5.5 10 133

Synopsis


Uploaded By: FREEMAN
June 02, 2021 at 10:06 PM

Director

Cast

Jon Pertwee as Victor
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
771.76 MB
1204*720
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
1 hr 23 min
P/S 5 / 17
1.4 GB
1792*1072
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
1 hr 23 min
P/S 9 / 25

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Radish4ever 9 / 10

A golden time for hammer - well worth watching

This film has not been seen since it (rumoured) was shown on TV in 1967 and 1973. This was considered by many to be a lost film, although some believed it still existed, This was proven right when then it was shown in the UK on talking pictures on 14/10/2018.

The story is simply, Henry Jekyll (Bernard Bresslaw) is a clumsy oaf, with no confidence, his brother is Victor (Jon Pertwee) they don't get on until Henry drinks a formula and turns into Teddy Hyde. Strong, charismatic and a love of danger. He steals the crown Jewels with minimal effort. Then he turns back to Henry. Victor discovers the jewels and then has to help the now limited Henry put the stolen items back - if he can do so in this state of existence. Is Teddy Hyde another version of Henry, or does he have the ability all along to emulate his alter-ego?

Excellent and enjoyable adventure - recommended and like most hammer films made around that time - well worth a look. The two main leads were both excellent. The music composed by Jo Loss and his Orchestra is catchy and sounds as good today as it did then.

A lost classic has resurfaced and this film needed to be seen again.

Reviewed by hitchcockthelegend 7 / 10

In the vault of Hammer Film there was an Ugly Duckling.

Thanks to UK Cable channel Talking Pictures, The Ugly Duckling has resurfaced. While it's no hidden gem demanding to be sought out as a critical must, it is however a joy for fans of British cinema with knowledge of such.

Story is a reworking of the Jekyll and Hyde story, with Bernard Bresslaw as Henry Jekll, a descendant of the not so good doctor. Henry is a bumbling buffoon, sweet, amiable and harmless, he does however drive all around him to distraction. Messing about in chemistry Henry transforms into Teddy Hyde, a womanising spiv, a man easy in the company of girls and gangsters alike. Trouble ahead does wait...

It's all very jolly and harmless, the center piece of plotting being a robbery of precious jewels that thrusts Henry/Teddy to the front of things. There's nothing deep on offer here, the dangers of messing with science, personality changes to fit in etc are not explored, this is played for light entertainment and works on those terms.

The dance hall background is firmly of its time, nicely so, with the Joe Loss Orchestra in full effect. While the period flavours are engaging as the rocking 50s close out as the more decadent swinging 60s beckons. The delight for Brit cinema fans here is with the cast, where lining up for some jollification are Jon Pertwee, Reginald Beckwith, Maudie Edwards, Richard Watiss, Michael Ripper, Shelagh Dey and David Lodge all propping up the ever likable Bresslaw. Bonus here is to get a rare look at the adorable Jean Muir, only two film credits when really she should have had more.

The Jekyll & Hyde axis of the story gives way to the jewel robbery in the final third, making this a tad disjointed, and the comedy is gentle and not likely to bring about raucous laughter (though one great line from Pertwee is absolute gold dust). Ultimately this has the ability to cover a compliant film fan for this ilk of cinema with a warm comfort blanket, for it be a time capsule worth opening. 7/10

Reviewed by malcolmgsw 6 / 10

I very been waiting 59 years to see this again

Thanastasia to TPTV I have at last managed to see this film again,59 years after seeing it at the ABC Golders Green.I enjoyed Bernard Bresslaw in the joint role.The film did flag a little towards the end.However the great way of presenting the cast at the end pepper thinks up.Good to see the last of the big band leaders Joe Loss.Incidentally,Sid Colin the scriptwriter,was once a musician in the big bands of the thirties.

Read more IMDb reviews

1 Comments

Be the first to leave a comment