The Cellar

1989

Horror

4
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Spilled 56%
IMDb Rating 4.5 10 521

Synopsis


Uploaded By: FREEMAN
May 09, 2021 at 04:33 AM

Director

Cast

Patrick Kilpatrick as Mance Cashen
Lou Perryman as Kyle Boatwright
Nick Gomez as Boy with Plane
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
788.17 MB
1280*682
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
1 hr 25 min
P/S 1 / 7
1.43 GB
1920*1024
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
1 hr 25 min
P/S 0 / 7

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by Tikkin 6 / 10

Slow start but pays off

Ther Cellar isn't brilliant but it does have its good points. It starts off very slowly and for the most part of the first half, it's boring. Things start looking up in the second half though, as we are introduced to the monster. The cellar setting is very effective, as are the tunnels where the monster lives. There is a suspenseful scene close to the end where the father locks his son in the kitchen to prove that "there's no monster". Of course, the monster comes out to attack the boy.

I wouldn't urge anyone to seek this out, but fans of cheap 80's horror might want to add it to their collection.

Reviewed by rosscinema 5 / 10

Standard fare

This is your run of the mill monster in the basement film that has absolutely no surprises. Not that its a bad film but why do something that has been done so many times before and offer nothing that we haven't seen already? The film stars Patrick Kilpatrick (Minority Report) who is bald in real life and you'll notice that he's wearing a hair piece. His character has anger issues and by the end of the film you have to think that his wife will have second thoughts about staying with him. He gets very violent at times. His son who has seen the monster is going to try and convince everyone of what he has seen and sets out to try and kill it himself. The film is hokey and predictable but even a bad monster in the basement flick is watchable. So is this one.

Reviewed by knsevy 5 / 10

Creepy and Crappy

You've read the plot summary, so I'll skip that part. Let's open the show with a few glaring flaws.

First off, the family moves into a house in the middle of nowhere, opens a sealed door they find hidden behind a cabinet, and discover they have a basement. None of that's so incredible, but Dad apparently has no problem with the fact that there's a gaping, monster-sized tunnel in one wall.

Secondly, monster mobility. The thing can apparently only manifest itself in three places: the house's cellar, a water-filled sinkhole that connects to its basement warren, and a dry oil well. It's allowed to come into the house by the rules of the film, but apparently only if someone opens the cellar door for it. What prevents it from crawling up out of the sinkhole or out from under the oilwell platform to wreak havoc in the open is never explained (my guess has a lot to do with the FX budget). And that cellar door? The one hidden behind a cabinet and ritually sealed by the Indians? Well, it also has a storm door leading right up into the yard, which isn't even locked.

Third, monster power. The thing's strong enough to overpower grown men with one paw and nearly pull limbs off trees, but it can't break down a flimsy cellar door to get at the goodies in the house?

All that being said, they did design a pretty nasty-looking beast, one that looks like a long-nosed version of the Terror Dogs from Ghostbusters (I call it Slime Rat). Unfortunately, they didn't have enough money to make a whole monster. Only the front half of it interacts on-screen with the actors, and it comes up looking pretty rubbery in close scenes.

It's okay for a cheap jump-at-a-body monster movie, and I didn't see the pacing problems that other reviewers have commented on. I think the key to enjoying this film is to be willing to let it scare you. Either that or ridicule it to death.

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