Sixty Six

2006

Biography / Comedy / Drama

3
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 65%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 66%
IMDb Rating 6.7 10 2786

Synopsis


Uploaded By: FREEMAN
April 16, 2021 at 11:11 AM

Director

Cast

Eddie Marsan as Manny Rubens
Rory McCann as Policeman
Peter Serafinowicz as Uncle Jimmy / Mr Rubens Snr / Football Commentary
Alfie Allen as Younger Tout
720p.WEB 1080p.WEB
859.33 MB
1280*694
English 2.0
PG-13
23.976 fps
1 hr 33 min
P/S 0 / 3
1.56 GB
1920*1040
English 2.0
PG-13
23.976 fps
1 hr 33 min
P/S 1 / 7

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by skippon 10 / 10

Brilliant family film

How nice to watch a film suitable for children that is funny, compassionate and resonates with their problems. No animation, no talking animals, but a boy and his family, He gets picked on, ignored, and teach himself to grow up. My ten year old grandson rates this as one of his favourite films ever.

It is also very appealing on an adult level. Witty, perceptive and devoid of sentimentality,it is plain good fun.

The acting and writing are flawless and the recreation of 1966 is breath-taking. I am in awe of the production designer and the colourisers. It all works smoothly, although it did leave me wondering 'How did they do that?'.

Reviewed by eucalyptus9 10 / 10

A flawless gem

There's been some good British movies produced of late. A while back I watched "This Is England" which was pretty good, although not one of Shane Meadows' best, in my opinion. But I note that it rates as 8.0 on IMDb, while this beautiful, magnificent, flawless gem of a movie only rates as 6.7.

Bernie is an overlooked, slightly neglected little Jewish kid who wants his bar mitzvah to outshine his older brother's. He wants it be in a swankier place, more guests, better presents. Mostly, what he wants is be recognized as someone important. But everything conspires against him - a series of disasters that befall his father, and the fateful scheduling of his bar mitzvah on the same day as the 1966 World Cup final, at which no-one really believes the English team will be present. But you never know. And if they do make it, nobody will want to attend Bernie's transition into a man. Bernie certainly does his best to prevent them from making it, from prayers, and curses and spells, to throwing darts at a picture of the team.

I laughed out loud several times during this movie (a rare occurrence these days, particularly when watching comedies). At other times, I was moved to tears. There's a scene towards the end in which Bernie's parents find the video taken of the older brother's bar mitzvah, which Bernie has plainly been watching. They turn it on, and there is the day, a joyful scene, no expense spared, lots of people, lots of gifts. What's also clear from the scenes that unfold is how Bernie is constantly overlooked, pushed aside, ignored. The director, having established the gist of the video, moves in for a long lingering look at Helena Bonham Carter's face (Bernie's mother). She's been the family's rock, the pillar of strength and loyalty. But in a masterpiece of acting (reminiscent of Nicole Kidman in the opera scene of "Birth", or Catalina Sandino Moreno walking through the airport in "Maria, Full Of Grace"), Bonham Carter's eyes reflect the dawning realization of how much she and her husband have neglected this little boy. The emotional forces raging within her are all reflected in minor changes of facial expression. This is a truly great actress.

The film itself is full of little profundities. The ending must strike at the heart of every father who's ever reflected on the mistakes he's made with his kids, or the times he's not been there for them.

A terrific film, one of the best I've seen in a long time. I can't find any fault with it, so it gets 10/10.

Reviewed by bopdog 8 / 10

Slow start, exciting finish. Thoughtful and nice 'slice of life' family portrait

I like all kinds of movies, and this quiet, thoughtful, 'homemade' kind of Brit-flick was enjoyable. There's not much of a plot--- a kid's approaching bar mitzvahs happens to fall on the same day as the 1966 soccer World Cup Final match. That scheduling conflict means no one will attend his event, and he has been taught and primed to expect the bar mitzvahs to be the most significant and important day in his life. So he is freaking out a bit--- but the soccer game is an issue only if Englands winds enough qualification games to enter the finals, and no one expects them to. Done. That's the plot. Obviously, the Big Day arrives; I leave it to you to discover how England fares, and how the kid's family life unfolds.

An important sub-plot is the kid's family. the dad is a retiring and overly-shy shlub, contrasted with his dynamic and 'life of the party', go-getter brother, the kid's uncle. The kid's older brother is a vicious bully, and his mom (Helena Bonham Carter) is the only loving, reasonable voice of strength in the family. Oh--- the kid's blind rabbi and bar mitzvahs coach, and Stephen Rae as the kid's physician also play a guiding roles for the boy.

Anyway--- things kind of creep along for the first half. It became a bit tedious, and I contemplated leaving. However, the second half was much perkier than the first, and the ending was genuinely exciting and thrilling. So, overall, while the pace was bit uneven, the end result was a pretty satisfying movie. In retrospect, I kind of wished the front end could have been a bit racier, or less 'portraiting' of the depressing family, or something. On balance, I liked it.

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