It's Always Fair Weather

1955

Comedy / Drama / Musical

4
Rotten Tomatoes Critics - Certified Fresh 88%
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 75%
IMDb Rating 7 10 3138

Synopsis


Uploaded By: FREEMAN
May 29, 2021 at 06:32 AM

Director

Cast

Cyd Charisse as Jackie Leighton
Gene Kelly as Ted Riley
Thurl Ravenscroft as Harry Wilson
Suzanne Ridgeway as Nightclub Patron
720p.BLU
931.26 MB
1280*496
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
1 hr 41 min
P/S 4 / 16

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by ptb-8 9 / 10

On The Turn

A perfect antidote or bookend to ON THE TOWN this excellent, mature and solid cinemascope musical is an absolute knockout. Made by MGM to placate Kelly for refusing to loan him to Samuel Goldwyn for GUYS AND DOLLS this film is probably one of the few 50s MGM efforts that plays well to audiences in 2004........but only of one sees it in cinemascope. Inventive use of the widescreen allows superb choreography to become ironic and witty......and the bewildering idiocy of TV stations to only show the center of the screen is an insult to any audience seeking to enjoy this clever and thoughtful musical. A small profit on first release and a drive in future saw this pic drop from view early in its life. the dance numbers are uniformly (no pun) astonishing and sometimes hilarious (especially Dolores Gray) BUT... I yi yi...Cyd Charisse in Baby You Knock Me Out lives up to its title. Trivia alert: one of the old boxers at Stillman's Gym is Gus Mecurio, father of STRICTLY BALLROOM lead dancer and actor Paul Mecurio. Kelly on skates is as good as Kelly singin in the rain...it's the same number but on wheels!.....this is a great film and a perfect musical. Imagine Kelly's rage at MGM after refusing him the Guys and Dolls loan out and they they distribute that film for Goldwyn anyway! No wonder WEATHER is such a suitably dark film of the disillusionment met head on in the American mid 50s. A full revival is much deserved.

Reviewed by bkoganbing 8 / 10

Friends Forever?

The folks that brought you Singing In The Rain, Gene Kelly, Stanley Donen, Betty Comden, Adolph Green, Cyd Charisse, and Arthur Freed combined their considerable talents to give us one of the last of the great MGM screen musicals in It's Always Fair Weather. The film got two Oscar nominations for Comden and Green for Best Original Screenplay and for Andre Previn for Best Musical Score. Previn also contributed the music for the original songs in this film.

I remember back in 1971 when I did the weekend warrior thing at Fort Polk and Fort Sam Houston I had a number of friends back in the day there. But a few years from now if circumstance ever brought a group of us together we'd find we have very little in common. In fact there are relatives of mine I barely keep up with because of the little we have in common.

Thus did army pals Gene Kelly, Dan Dailey, and Michael Kidd find themselves after ten years earlier in David Burns's bar swearing that they would meet there ten years later and still be best pals in 1945 after V-J Day.

Well it's now 1955 and Gene Kelly is a native New Yorker. Michael Kidd actually comes down from Schenectady thinking his two friends will be there. Dan Dailey is an advertising executive working on a third ulcer and happens to be in from Chicago. Both Kelly and Dailey realize the day and half heartedly go to the bar and the three do run into each other. But life has led them down three different paths and they have nothing in common, but military service.

Dailey's firm advertises on a show hosted by Dolores Gray which seems to be a combination Queen For A Day, This Is Your Life, and Candid Camera. Her producer Cyd Charisse thinks the reunion of the veterans would be a great show and she contrives to make sure they're all there for the broadcast. Kelly she gives her personal attention to. He's got the most trouble. He's a fight manager whose heavyweight is going into the tank for gangster Jay C. Flippen.

Mix all those elements and you have a nice original story idea with some good songs, none of which became any kind of hit. The best numbers are by Gene Kelly dancing on rollerskates proclaiming his new found love for Charisse down the city streets just like in Singing In The Rain. I also liked Dolores Gray's numbers as well.

But I like her character as the overbearing TV host. I don't think it was any accident she bears some resemblance to Jean Hagen's Lina Lamont in Singing In The Rain as Comden and Green wrote that screenplay also. Hard to believe there were really shows like Madeline's back in the day.

It's Always Fair Weather, another quality product from the Arthur Freed unit at MGM. You can never go wrong there.

Reviewed by mmallon4 7 / 10

Stormy Weather Ahead

It's Always Fair Weather will go down in history as the film musical which "could have been". Had it been made a few years earlier it could have been in the same leagues as Singin' In the Rain and On the Town but several shortcomings, some determined by the period the film was made prevent it from being so. Even the studio had that little faith in it they dumped it as a second feature alongside Bad Day At Black Rock.

It's Always Fair Weather differs from other musicals of its time in its sombre tone with the tale of three war buddies who are reunited ten years later to find out they can't stand each other upon discovering one is a hick, a snob and a goon. This is juxtaposed to a world of beautiful, bright colours and welcome artificiality with urban sets to die for. It's Always Fair Weather was originally conceived as a sequel to On the Town, reuniting Gene Kelly with co-stars Frank Sinatra and Jules Munshin. However, by 1955, Munshin no longer had box office credibility while Sinatra was too big a star that the studio was unwilling to work with him. In their place, we get Dan Dailey and Michael Kidd, both of whom get the job done but lack the same electric chemistry Kelly's On the Town co-stars possessed. Frank Sinatra in particular I find is sorely missed as I loved his three-picture partnership with Kelly in which they made an excellent comedic duo. None the less the roaster does get a big boost with the casting of the great Cyd Charisse, whom like Ann Miller in On the Town, plays a glamorous woman with contradictory personality and an encyclopedic knowledge of well, pretty much any topic.

However, I find It's Always Fair Weather's biggest drawback are the sections of the film which are uneventful and doesn't have the lightning-fast pace of On The Town or Singin' In The Rain. The film could definitely benefit from the trimming or removal of whole scenes; there is a faster-paced, snappier film in here. The film does help make up for this though in its musical numbers. It's Always Fair Weather does showcase some of the best moments of any MGM musical with the soundtrack being one of the best in the MGM catalogue. The musical numbers and compositions are fantastic and all written for the film itself by the great Betty Comden and Adolph Green, while the majority of MGM musicals took their songs from their back catalogue as well as other stage musicals.

The five-minute Gershwin like dance number "The Binge" showcases the then-new cinemascope format by having three dancers occupy their own third of the screen as they dance and create percussion with trash can lids on their feet as they work together in great physical tandem of drunken joy. Once Upon a Time, on the other hand, is a heart aching number if there was one as the three men sing about their broken dreams while Music is Better Than Words couldn't be more enchanting if you asked for it. The centrepiece of the film, however, is Gene Kelly's number 'I Like Myself', featuring him tap dancing on roller skates, no trickery! Like Singin' In the Rain, the number is an encapsulation of pure happiness (just look at the faces of the onlooking extras). This is of my favourite musical numbers of all time and is an unbelievable display of talent if I ever saw it. The film's only crime in the song and dance department is the lack of a dance number between Gene Kelly and Cyd Charisse, despite one actually being filmed.

I feel widescreen technology came too late the MGM musicals which could have used it to great advantage but by 1955 musicals had already lost most of their economic viability due to the rise of television. It's Always Fair Weather is Hollywood coming to terms with the existence of its rival television but relishes the opportunity to satirize the format as superficial and ridden with advertising.

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