Hangover Square

1945

Action / Crime / Drama / Music

2
Rotten Tomatoes Audience - Upright 72%
IMDb Rating 7.4 10 2559

Synopsis


Uploaded By: FREEMAN
May 27, 2021 at 04:54 PM

Director

Cast

Francis Ford as Ogilby - Fulham Antique Dealer
George Sanders as Dr. Allan Middleton
Linda Darnell as Netta Longdon
Alan Napier as Sir Henry Chapman
720p.BLU 1080p.BLU
716.13 MB
988*720
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
1 hr 17 min
P/S 5 / 9
1.3 GB
1472*1072
English 2.0
NR
23.976 fps
1 hr 17 min
P/S 0 / 4

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by telegonus 10 / 10

Cregar! Cregar!

Hangover Square is the last film Laird Cregar made in his brief, remarkable career. Freely adapted from Patrick Hamilton's novel, it was directed by John Brahm, photographed by Joseph LaShelle, and features a memorably thunderous score by Bernard Herrmann. Like the previous year's The Lodger, also a Cregar-Brahm collaboration, this is a killer on the loose in Victorian London movie. Aside from some fancily shot scenes early on, this would not in itself be an extraordinary film but for Cregar's portrayal of the lead character, a man who murders when he hears loud, sudden noises. In his quieter moments the man is, of all things, a composer!

There are many fine scenes in this film but it's basically Cregar's show from start to finish, and he does not disappoint. His performance is so brilliant, empathetic, nuanced, and for all the melodrama, utterly believable, that it's impossible not to focus on him at the expense of the rest of the movie.

Perhaps the best way to describe Cregar's acting style here is to imagine A Streetcar Named Desire being performed entirely inside someone's mind, with the characters of Stanley and Blanche being played by the same actor, in a Victorian setting, disguised as a murder story. One wonders where Cregar found the inspiration for such work. He was one of the greatest actors to ever grace the screen, and one of the most enigmatic. American-born, he tended to play Brits. Unlike his fellow American Anglophile actor and friend, Vincent Price, he had no education to speak of. Within a span of less than five years he went from supporting player to star. In this movie he is top-billed over Fox hottie Linda Darnell. Not too shabby for a morbidly obese man several inches over six feet in height who, while still in his twenties, was playing men well into their forties.

Cregar had a way of making even accomplished co-stars like Cedric Hardwicke and George Sanders look like amateurs by comparison. He wasn't even trying to. One should watch his films to see what a great actor is like. His roles weren't always great, but he was. Forget Sean Penn and his tantrums, or Meryl Streep's mannered Yale Drama School flair for accents. Cregar was the real deal. The only American actor I can think of who could give him a run for his money would be Brando. Sadly, Cregar was as tormented as he was gifted, was full of self-hatred, for a variety of reasons, and went on a crash diet after completing this film in the hope of becoming a romantic leading man. But he lost the weight so fast it killed him. He was twenty-eight years old.

Reviewed by ccthemovieman-1 9 / 10

Cregar & Camera-work Make This Worth Checking Out

If you admire good acting, directing and cinematography, this is a good movie to watch. It combines all of those elements. Whoever did the DVD transfer is to be complimented, too: the picture is sharp and the lighting is outstanding.

After a quick shocking opening, the story settles in for awhile and you have to stick with it. If you're used to modern movies, you'll get bored but if you hang around "Hangover Square" to where the main figure commits his second crime, the rest of the film gets better and better from that point. So does the direction and the photography. Kudos to Director John Brahm for a variety of interesting angles, from floor level to above-ceiling, through peep holes and anywhere else he could think of to shoot the scene.

If you're a fan of film noir, Cinematographer Josesph LaShelle's work here will keep you enthralled. Once he gets rolling, scene after scene is jaw-dropping in his array of lights and shadows - superb stuff.

Laird Cregar, meanwhile, is mesmerizing as "George Harvey Bone," a demented composer who, upon hearing discordant notes, literally goes insane and gets violent, intending to choke the life out of the last person who got him upset. What a shame the young Cregar never lived to see his great performance on screen. Read his biography here on IMDb, as it is interesting and tragic. In fact, if you rent or have this film's DVD, check out the 20-minute bonus feature of Cregar's career. The fact that the actor is still talked about in reverent tones in Hollywood some 60 years after his death, is a testimony to his acting prowess. particularly since his career was so short.

Linda Darnell adds a lot of sex appeal and evilness to "Hangover Square" and George Sanders - surprise - plays a good guy. How often do you see that?

The finale in here also is incredible - one you are guaranteed to remember!

Now that "Hangover Square" is available on DVD with such a great transfer, I highly recommend it.

Reviewed by Doylenf 7 / 10

Cregar, Darnell, Herrmann...what a combination...

HANGOVER SQUARE is one of my favorite films in which LAIRD CREGAR appeared--in fact, his last before a crash diet ruined his health and led to his death at age 28. Seeing him in this film, made me realize what a wonderful Rochester he would have made in '44's JANE EYRE. He had the kind of presence that looms over every frame of this film, even when he's not actually in the scene.

He's a troubled musician who reacts violently when he hears certain discordant sounds. LINDA DARNELL makes an attractive romantic presence in her period costuming (it takes place in Victorian London), and GEORGE SANDERS does a nice job as a doctor (a good guy for a change).

The scenes that stand out are Cregar climbing the ladder of a bonfire to dispose of his latest victim and the finale where he's playing the piano in a deserted building as the flames spread around him--all the while Bernard Herrmann's score is making an impact.

It's a delicious LAIRD CREGAR performance and a fitting finale to his short but illustrious career. It's somewhat similar to a previous film, THE LODGER, another Victorian thriller he did with Merle Oberon.

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